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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 81 (some duplicates have been removed)
ronald reagan? president of the united states two successful four-year terms. on the domestic front, he enacted a major economic recovery package followed by an overhaul of social security. and in his second term, reagan gained a major tax reform. on the defense front, republican president reagan again with the help of the rity presided over a major increase in the defense budget, congress presided over a major increase in the defense budget, the defe including straby millions of protesters here and abroad. also commander in chief reagan gained secret aid for freedom fighters in central america, the quote unquote contras. in his second term reagan negotiated a nuclear arms control treaty with our then by senate. enemy the soviet union ratified by a democratic center. in republican reagan could work with democrats controlling both the house and for two years the senate, why can't president obama, a democrat, achieve more with republicans who control the house and his democrats who control the senate? >> there's a lot of myth about tip o'neal and ronald reagan working together. they did n
in the way the modern president does. it happened to ronald reagan, it happened to bill clinton, george bush. and that is, obama fatigues. three years from now, people will be writing columns about obama fatigue, just as they did about clinton fatigue and bush fatigue and reagan fatigue. franklin roosevelt only gave 30 fireside chats in 12 years. he understood instinctively the dangers of overexposure. he also controlled the media to an extent that modern presidents could not hope to. host: looking back, fdr broke the unwritten code of serving more than two terms. wetoday's modern age, could have more than two terms for any president? you worked for ronald reagan. if his health was better, of third term? guest: i doubt it. he talked about it after he left office. he was going to campaign for appeal of that amendment. he thought the american people should be able to vote for anyone wanted to vote for. it is very difficult to imagine after eight years of office -- we've used up our presidents. that is why this string of two- term presidents is really so unusual. we have a string of one-term pr
not come into our homes in the way the modern president does. it happened to ronald reagan, it happened to bill clinton, george bush. and that is, obama fatigues. three years from now, people will be writing columns about obama fatigue, just as they did about clinton fatigue and bush fatigue and reagan fatigue. franklin roosevelt only gave 30 fireside chats in 12 years. he understood instinctively the dangers of overexposure. he also controlled the media to an extent that modern presidents could not hope to. host: looking back, fdr broke the unwritten code of serving more than two terms. he was elected to four terms. in today's modern age, could we have more than two terms for any president? guest: great question. >> you worked for ronald reagan. if his health was better, of course, would he have run for a third term? guest: i doubt it. he talked about it after he left office. he was going to campaign for appeal of that amendment. he thought the american people should be able to vote for anyone wanted to vote for. it is very difficult to imagine after eight years of office -- we've used
, you can come back to ronald reagan, and lo and behold, no surprise, there is a rejection of the jimmy carter years, with a very formal, gold tickets to inaugural balls, and clearly it is an inaugural ball. the program that seems sort of informal for his, becomes pinched very formal -- becomes very formal just a few years later. this says something about those administrations and what they are trying to conceive and produce during those events, and it also says something about all of us as well -- something about the nation, its feelings, what it was looking for because they are certainly trying to play off of that as well. part of the material that we collect is just about the enthusiasm. now, inaugurations are meant to be days of national celebration and national unity. they are not, obviously, always that way, so these kind of souvenirs that people might create, just as in the days of george washington -- you know, here are these brass buttons, these little penance that people could buy from the vendors on the street and take home. i particularly like this. this is a little glass tr
and presidential overreach? >> we have a history and, if you look at ronald reagan he accomplished tax reform in the second term and president clinton made progress towards the balanced budget. there was good second-term accomplishment. it is not like we're roaming around the white house looking for things to do. we have immigration, gun safety, measures to help the economy and energy and we have a stack agenda here. there is urgency in the country for us to address this. we'll bring the same energy and focus he did to the second term. obviously, other administrations got, you know, in trouble with scandals. we avoided that and hope to continue that. but, those issues and others, education reform, there is just no shortage of things we can do to help the american middle class and the economy. we're going to pursue those and we are mindful of it and i think you have to stay connected with what you ran on and you can't bring stuff out of thin air, you know, i think one of the problems with the social security privatization effort during the bush administration was that wasn't really a core thin
,esident's wilson, ronald reagan, now barack obama, seven times in u.s. history that the official day for the swearing in falls on a sunday. meaning that the public ceremony will take place tomorrow. coming up in a couple of minutes we will look at this inauguration and in the next hour more of what the president can expect as he embarks on his second term and some of the lessons from past seven term -- second term presidents. we will be taking you to arlington cemetery in the next half-hour, where the president and vice president will lay a wreath at the tomb of the unknown. getting under way just before noon eastern today. back in a moment. ♪ >> hi, barack obama, solemnly swear-i will execute the office of president to the united states faithfully. >> that i will execute faithfully -- [flubs] >> when john roberts administered the oath to barack obama on january 20, 2009, there was a major problem. roberts was supposed to say -- faithfully execute the office of president of the united states. barack obama then stop, pause, smiled -- as if to say, come on, this is my big day, you ha
romney won't be here. the last time a vanquished opponent didn't show up was in 1985 for ronald reagan, and walter mondale was a no-show. that was the last time that the 20th state fell on a sunday and they had to do the monday as i rememberrial, versus another day. and back in those days, it was the coldest one on record, 7 degrees. there will be differences between the obama 2009 and 2013. four years ago, the crowd estimate was nearly 2 million people. there is a big parlor game about whether the crowd estimates on the mall are ever accurate. but nearly 2 million. now they are saying between 600- to 800,000. and there are a series of other things. and the money. four years ago, the obama administration, the obama campaign raised $53 million for the inaugural with personal contributions, all capped at $50,000 or less and there was disdain expressed by the administration about taking corporate money, et cetera. all of those conditions have been lifted. they are taking corporate monet and $50,000 cap has been lifted and it's smaller. they don't expect to raise $53 million, making it eas
inaugural. but also theodore roosevelt, dwight eisenhower, ronald reagan. i look at it more as a form of relaxation for the president when we get to meet him. he gets to chew the fat a lit bit about past presidents. >> doris, you're a presidential expert, how do you rate president obama in the pantheon of great presidents? or just presidents? >> well, you know, when you think about the great presidents, great necessities call forth great leaders. so george washington, abraham lincoln, fdr had a huge crises to face. obama had a pretty big crisis to face. he did accomplish in health care something since presidents since teddy roosevelt have been trying to accomplish. but i think most importantly, we'll see now the fact that he's got a second term, that's really important to embolden him for what he can accomplish, and more importantly, to show that the country supported kurg a very difficult time his leadership and they wanted him back again. so i think he's got a shot. it depends a lot on what happens in the second term, if he can create -- i wish he would go in the midterms to try to
-elect ronald reagan in 1980. it was goldwater, you see, who approved reagan's famous a time for choosing television address which made reagan a political star overnight and led to his running for governor of california and eventually president of these united states. david recounts how bill rusher shored up the goldwater committee when money ran short and spirits sagged. skillfully guided young americans for freedom if his early, chaotic days, enforced some order and discipline on the blythe spirits who ran national review, expanded a conservative movement through the tv program "the advocates," husband newspaper column and his -- his newspaper column and his lectures and championed ronald reagan when other conservatives were somewhat skeptical about the actor-turned--politician. bill rusher loved american politics, rare wines, traveling to distant lands and national review's effervescent editor, bill buckley. of whom he once said, quote: the most exasperating people in the world are so off the most beloved -- are so often the most beloved, and he is no exception. now, david frisk has ca
. ronald reagan's first inaugural speech was an economic speech. the context was inflation which was a threat to the country at that time. but most of others, bush was like that too, most of the other good ones, jefferson's first or whatever, they're really about the values that unite the country and then also try to put your moment in the broad long context of american history. why this is important and how we're led forward. without being a policy address, it says we have certain values that mean we have to confront certain problems. if i was working on this speech, which i'm not, i would address this problem of polarization, the deep divisions of our country, how we get passed that, achieve common purposes in this country and the president would benefit even in the partisan debates looking large in this speech. >> these inaugurations, second ones are ability healing, is the president in a healing state of mind. >> the way he first came to national attention was his famous 2004 democratic convention speech, most memorable line not red states of america or blue states but the un
especially discouraging education was the fight against ronald reagan's decision in 1983 to station a medium-range missiles in europe to counter the soviet buildup of similar missiles on his side of the dividing line between its domain and the west. massive protests were planned here at home and all over the world, with the biggest one scheduled for the hague, to which over 1 million people from every country in western europe were streaming pipeline, by bus, and on foot. the dutch broadcasters have erected a glass booth overlooking the square to which the protesters were all marching, and they invited and ends from various european countries to sit there and comment on this great event. evidently, however, they were unable to find anyone in the whole of europe willing or able to support reagan's decision, which ish i repeat a panicky call at the last minute inviting me to participate, so desperate were they to spice up their discussion with anna from his action fascist, although i often played in those days, that he even offered to fly me over on the monstrously expensive concord. and so it
. the last time it happened on a sunday was in 1985 when ronald reagan was inaugural rated for his second term and that day was historic because of how cold it was. 7 degrees that day. we are looking at much, much warmer temperatures. a beautiful day here today and supposed to be nice and pleasant tomorrow as well though we may get a little bit of snow later in the afternoon. martha? >> what kind of crowds are we expecting. we remember the historic and huge crowds there for president obama's first inauguration. >> crowd counting is a big sport in washington and it is disputed by people who think it is not a reliable number. last time around there were aerial shots and people went to great pains to actually count heads and estimate it and came up with almost 2 million people. nobody expects it to viral that. the crowd estimates ben 600,000 and 800,000 people. do not rule out the possibility that organizers are low balling and playing the expectations game assaying it could be as few as 600 so when it is a bit more than that it won't look as scant as it was four years ago at nearly 4 millio
on the east side of the capital. and then four years later, when ronald reagan was inaugurated on the west front. sometimes he is credited for making that change, but that change was in the world for quite awhile. it would have been on the west front with carter, later, had ts turn that different. the view on the east front, compared to the west front was not very good. the east front used to be a parking lot, and then you have homes. parking lot, streets, kind of like a little town. whereas, here on the west side, you can accommodate these immense crowds. and they can see something. >> of course, president obama's first inaugural was attended by over a million people, i believe, gathering on the mall. the expectations is it will be somewhere about half that tomorrow. that is typical of second inauguration's. they are not as well -- publicly attended as the first. i think it is because the country is not as excited, they know who you are, they have seen you. my friend, who was also a chief speech writer for bill clinton -- i read something that he had written recently -- and let us begin,
of jimmy carter. on the east front of the capitol and i was here four years later when ronald reagan was inaugurated on the west front. it would have been carter'sen second inauguration if the election came out differently. but the viewing situation was not very good. the east front of the capitol used to be a parking lot. where as at the west front you can accommodate the immense crowds and they can see something. guest: i might add that president obama's first inaugural was attended by over one million people and the expectations will be half of that. i think that is typical of second inaugurations. they are not as well -- publicly attended as the first. i think it is because, you know, the country is not as excited. they know who you are. they have seen you a friend of mine was a writer for bill clinton i read something he said recently to say let us begin is more inspiring than let us continuing. i think that is a true point. host: let's go back to january 2005 as george w. bush was sworn into a second term. >> on this day prescribe bid law and marked by ceremony, we celebrate th
the worst thing, brenda. the left likes to say, well, you know, ronald reagan raised the debt limit 18 times, george bush raised it 7 times, bill clinton raised it 8 times. so, you know, both sides do it so it must be okay, and from the perspective of fair and balanced, it has to stop no matter who is president. we go through the same cycle, we raise the debt limit, spend more,en go out and borrow more, and raise the debt limit again and it looks like it's unstoppable, but this is the check and balance of how t govern our society. we can't afford the bills we have now to pay. someone has to say, no, spend what you have and let's move on. >> brenda: you know, it doesn't really mean anything. why not get rid of it. it's been used for political hay, both parties have made political hay out of it. >> that's right, every 18 months we're going through an economic crisis and here we have another one brewing regarding the debt ceiling. let's get rid of it. i'm all for smaller government, but this economy rig now, guys, still remains fragile and you can't have the american consumer having to worry ab
the disability treaty, something that ronald reagan would have supported. he had commitments from a number of republicans. he was on the floor in a wheelchair a great jeopardy to his own health and they voted it down. that is a sad commentary. i could see it on some things like you may have a dispute over arms control agreement. disability affects everybody. it got voted down. it is not the same as when i came in. i've seen greek leaders and a number of others -- great leaders in a number of others, it is one of the most typical jobs. you have so many people on different agendas often named a minority i. >> comely circle back to the next agenda item? -- can we circle back to the next agenda items that you say you are a gun owner. what is your view on-magazine clips? >> i say having a weapon with a 30 round magazine for civilian use is a weapon you use a in war. i do not see a need for it. vermont has a virtually no gun violence. laws. we do limit the amount of rounds again have during deer season for a semi-automatic. we have to be as protective of our citizens generally as that. i've neve
, and as a result, it got compressed and warmed up as it came through. there's a live look at ronald reagan's washington national airport right now. 62 today. not a record for the date, but it is the warmest inauguration day on record. the unofficial record because it's hard to have weather records that far back. march 4th, 1793, george washington's inauguration, 61 degrees. officially the warmest inauguration day is 55 from reagan's first inaugural. we're at 55 degrees in washington. winds remain strong out of the northwest at 18 miles per hour. that northwest wind, that's the leading edge of the colder air we've been talking about for days. it is inbound, and this warmer air is on its way out. so as you make your plans for tomorrow, a colder start than this morning. temperatures in the 30s climbing into the mid-40s tomorrow, but clouds on the increase tomorrow, and there will be a chance for some passing snow showers late in the day. so good-bye to the warmer air. as the cold snap starts to roll in here, the leading edge of the arctic air arrives around sunset tomorrow and that will set u
. andrew jackson was first sworn in on the east side of the capitol building and ronald reagan the first on the west. the shortest inauguration dress was george washington's second. six presidents have taken the oath outside washington. george washington first in new york, and then in philadelphia. john adams in philadelphia. chester arthur in new york. teddy roosevelt in buffalo. calvin coolidge in plymouth, vermont, and l.b.j. in dallas. james polk's inauguration was the first to be covered using the telegraph and war enharding's parade was the first to use cars. buchanan's inauguration was the first one photographed and william mckin le's was the first filmed. hoover's was the first in a movie newsreel. the first to be televised was harry truman and the first streams in the internets was bill clinton's second. lincoln's parade was the first to include african-americans acknowledged wilson's was the first to include women. bad weather moved some indoors. grants touched it out in 16 degrees and jack kennedy in 20 degrees without an overcoat. f.d.r.'s inauguration was the first held in j
including back in 1985 during the second inauguration of president ronald reagan and also when eisenhower, he took his first of the second oath on a sunday. >> arthel: and reports you probably saw the official swearing in live on fox news, but the real celebration will take place tomorrow when president obama takes his public oath of office in front of hundreds of thousands of well-wishers at the national mall. chief political correspondent carl cameron is live with the preview. right now how is the crowd overall? >> it's getting busy but not as busy as four years ago. president obama made history when he made reelection. he was the first president that had fewer popular votes and fewer votes in the electoral college. this is likely to be more subdued out of deference to the economy and national challenges faced by the u.s.a. and the new president there are metrics to show. four years ago there was about 2 million people that showed up. this time around, experts are predicting somewhere between 600,000 to 800,000 so it could be a third of the crowd four years ago. in addition these are no
inaugural, beat the 7 degrees it was for ronald reagan's second. >> that's right. let's talk about where the president is, as he starts his second four years in office even before the gun debate is hammering his approval. 51% approval rating which is really where george w. bush was, it's 19 points less than bill clinton was, but far below where he was. >> alisyn: yeah, you remember four years ago how exciting it was for the country as he was being sworn in and how much hope there was for hope and change and back then, the approval rating according to gallup was 68% and today, you know, after four years and obviously, it's harder to be a president than a hopeful candidate, it's at 48%. >> steve: you know what's interesting, about two or three weeks ago at the conclusion of december, the gallup poll number was, don't tell me, was 58%, so, closer to 60. what's happened in the last couple of weeks? well, you know, he did win that fiscal cliff thing and jacked up taxes on the most successful people in the country a campaign promise and experts say it looks as if his push to reining in gun vio
inauguration of ronald reagan and when eisenhower in 1957 was taking his second oath. >>gregg: as president obama prepares to kickoff the second concern there is growing concern over the administration's recently outlined plan to rewrite the nation's gun laws. beginning with a campaign style tour to drum up support. doug, is the president's campaign-like approach to all of this a response to the tough partisan realities on capitol hill? >> that is a good statement. for example, republican senator rand paul has vowed to introduce legislation to nullify the president's 23 executive actions he signed last week. he says the founders did not want the president to become a king. senator feinstein's plan to introduce a new assault weapons and extended magazine ban is facing daunting obstacles. >> i don't think senator harry reid brings it to the senate floor because he has six democrats up for election in two years in states where the president received fewer than 42 percent of the votes. >> leader harry reid will make guns one of the earliest things we consider. chairman leahy has talked about he
on 20th being on sunday was ronald reagan and it was 7 degrees. there is record low. we are nothing like that today. we won't be tomorrow either. >> heather: it looks beautiful. thank you. be sure and tune in tomorrow for full coverage of the any understanding raise, bret baier and megyn kelly will anchor events systematic at 11:00 a.m. eastern. >> gregg: a fox news alert. breaking details now on that hostage crisis in algeria. security officials say even more bodies have been found now inside the remote desert gas plant, just one day after bloody raid ended the four day standoff. dozens of hostages did manage to escape unharmed but 23 were killed. there are new reports that there was as many 8 americans among the hostages, one has died and seven escaped. there is growing concern over the fate of two other americans who remain missing this hour. coner powell has the latest. >> reporter: algerian officials saying the death toll that does stand at 23 is likely to increase in the next few days as they get more and more information. algerian officials have spent the last 24 hours or so shift
. and this is the 7th time, scott, on a sunday the president has taken the oath of office. the last time ronald reagan in 1985. scott. >> pelley: the robinson family, of course is the family of michelle obama. her grandmother originally owned this bible. this is the blue room. there is the chief justice of the united states. and we expect to see the president very shortly. >> please raise your right hand and repeat after me. i barack obama hussein obama do solemnly swear. >> that i will faithfully execute. >> that i will faithfully execute. >> the office of president of the united states. >> the office of president of the united states. >> and will to the best of my ability. >> and will to the best of my ability. >> preserve, protect and defend. the constitution of the united states. >> the correspondence steution of the united states. >> so help you god. me god. congratulations, mr. president. >> thank you mr. chief justice. thank you so much. ( applause ) thank you, sir. >> i did it. all right. thank you everybody. >> pelley: just as simple as that the president with the first family in the blue ro
of where george w. bush was in 2005 but seven points behind bill clinton. >> ronald reagan had the same rating as bill clinton at 62% and richard nixon was down to 51% in 1973. both lyndon johnson and dwight eisenhower topped everyone here, they reached the low 70s. they were at 71% and 73% respentively. >> that's pretty impressive. >> those numbers would never exit tod exist today. >>> thousands of people are starting to descend this morning. >> never too early to get ready. this morning, though, we'll look past the oath of office to the next four years. the issues, the plans, the prospects. as joe johns reports, some of the most notorious scandals also happened in the second term. >> reporter: president obama has high hopes for the next four years. >> i intend to carry out the agenda that i campaigned on. >> reporter: if he wants to reach that goal, history says a second-term president has got to move fast. >> power does seep away from the presidency very quickly in the second term. >> second term presidents and their congresses have two different clocks and the president's clock is n
clinton's second term, he made significant progress on balanced budgets and ronald reagan accomplished tax reforms. >> even if they're dealing with other problems. >> and we have been fortunate to be scandal-free and we want to continue that, but if you look, it's not like we're roaming around the west wing looking for things to do. right now in front of congress and the country you have the need to reduce the deficit and continue to grow the economy, energy and climate change, immigration, gun safety. things are stacked up. and so i think that that is going to provide the sort of focus and energy you need and i think his intention is to run through the tape all the way through. >> gun safety has jumped to the top of the president's agenda since newtown and this week the president promised that the weight of his office behind these proposals, but we're already seeing a lot of resistance from democrats and i want to show some of the reaction this week. senator max baucus "before passing new laws we need a thoughtful debate that respects responsible law abiding gun owners in montana instead
saw throughout the first term. very similar to what ronald reagan dealt with during his eight years. personally, the public really likes president obama. 74%. but his policies, again, more people disapprove of the policies. 49%, than approve of them there, at 47%. so what about the next four years? sort of a mixed optimism, if you will. i go back to the idea of pragmatic hope. 43% optimistic. 43% pessimistic. 22% kind of mixed. and staying with the theme of word clouds, david, we asked folks to send a message to president obama. what would they like to say for his second term? and as you can see here, look at the most popular phrases. a lot of them have to do with the economy. fix the economy. create jobs. then there's stop spending. and then of course probably the most important that he will talk about tomorrow, compromise, work together. >> chuck todd, thank you very much. >>> let me bring in the rest of our roundtable here. joe scarborough is here from msnbc's "morning joe." adviser to obama 2012, david axelrod. chief foreign correspondent richard engel is here, safe and sound in
model for him would be bill clinton's inaugural address, or ronald reagan's second inaugural. both of those were similar kinds of political environments. congress was in the hands of the other party. or one house was, at least. and each of them was very gracious towards the other party. reached out, said things about the goodwill of the other party. >> the difference there is reagan could look back and talk about how the republicans worked with democrats to fix social security, bill clinton could look back and talk about the deficit reduction plan. other things they had done a little bit together. it's harder for president obama to do that because there's been so much polarization. >> polarization has been on both sides. it would be a good step for the president, i actually don't expect him to take it. to try to put that behind, to have at least a rhetorical frame for being more enveloping. obviously in the last few days, last week or so, he hasn't taken that tact. he's, he had his press conference about a week ago. he's had some, they've floated some stories about how they're goin
. this is when ronald reagan started his second term and bill cl clinton here up at 60%. a low point in terms of his three most recent predecessor as a two-term president. but a high point for this president. if you look at this here, this goes back through the carter presidency and george h.w. bush presidency and you see, again, a low mark for any president in modern time. thinks things in the country are going well, but better for him if you look at the obama presidency here. now, here's a question here. what kind of president will the president obama be in his second term? 54%, majority of americans think he is above average or outstanding. that is a good number for the president. but you see, again, just over 40% of americans say he is below average or poor. a partisan divide and this shows you why. the american people, look at that number. 76% of americans think the country is more deeply divided than in the past. unity bringing people together and getting the government to work is a big challenge of the president's second inaugural address. 70% of americans are hopeful that the presiden
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 81 (some duplicates have been removed)

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